Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Camp Read-A-Lot: A Genre Classroom Campout


Welcome to Camp Read-A-Lot!
 
Just imagine their excitement when you tell your class that you're going camping ... in the classroom! My planning team and I love to do this at the beginning of each year. It's a fun way to get the kids familiar with the different genres. If you decide a classroom campout is in your future, there's a freebie at the end of this post!

At the poetry station, students read a few poems and talk about how poems make them feel. Then, they read a rhyming poem about s'mores and fill in the blanks with rhyming words. Finally, it's snack time! I like to dip marshmallows in melted chocolate and crushed up graham crackers.
At the fables station, They read various fables and talk about the elements of a fable. The students use some of these fables and this flipbook as they work: Fables and Flipbooks

At the Realistic Fiction station, we read Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. The students use what they've learned about realistic fiction to decide of that story fits. Finally, use a fill-in-the-blanks story to write their own realistic fiction story about a camping adventure. (Hint: Freebie!)

The final station is the Fairy Tale station. This is by far the station that gets the most laughs! First, the students learn about the genre. Then, they fill in a fairy tale adlib. It's hilarious!! My teacher partner found it, but I can't figure out where - most likely Pinterest! :)
 
Check out some pics from our day!

 
 
 
 

 
Freebie Time!
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Genre-Classroom-Campout-Set-2176404





Tuesday, October 27, 2015

5 Life Lessons Your Students Will Learn From Kid Kids Club

 
1. Empathy is not only noticing how someone is feeling, but also changing the way you act to be sensitive to their feelings.
In an elementary classroom, this is a vital lesson to teach your students. Many elementary students are still in the "me centered" world mostly because no one has ever challenged them to step out. I use a wonderful book as an introduction. It walks a little girl through learning what empathy is and shows her trying it out in real life scenarios.


2. You can make a difference in this great big world.
Kids often think they're too small to make an impact. I talk about the ripple effect that random act of kindness can have. We talk about how our small act of kindness (like helping a friend pick up their dropped lunch) can ripple and move from person to person.

3. Random Acts of Kindness, whether big or small, change the world.
Kindness is important. We learn that you can show kindness through smiling at another student as they pass in the hall or asking a friend how their day is going. You can also plan out your kindness on a larger scale such as collecting stuffed animals and books for kids in foster care. All of these acts of kindness are equally important!


4. When we work together, we can make a bigger difference.
This is shown through missions such as having a canned food drive or writing letters to a fire station thanking them for working on Thanksgiving. We talk about how one can or one letter would be nice, but 25 cans or 25 letters is even better!

5. Helping someone else helps you too!
This is the final and most important lesson!  Kind Kids Club helps my students to build a sense of community and purpose. After experiencing how wonderful it feels to help another person, I notice this becoming the norm in our classroom. The kids start noticing each other's feelings and helping one another.


Check out this post about setting up Kind Kids Club in your room!